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These are some of the labels most frequently seen on the products we supply, and which we use on our product pages to provide handy information about the product in question. Here we include short descriptions of what the labels mean. They are normally associated with a particular certification, accreditation or affiliation. Click on a symbol - or the link in the accompanying text - to visit the organization's website for more information.

We also use some non-proprietary symbols on our product pages to indicate characteristics of products which are not covered by any specific certification - for example a vegan product which is not registered with the Vegan Association, and which therefore does not bear their logo. We include these in-house labels only where we believe they provide useful additional information. These are listed at the end of this page.

Proprietary Labels

fairtrade mark The Fairtrade Mark is the symbol (standardized internationally in 2002) of Fairtrade International (FLO), represented in the UK by the Fairtrade Foundation. Products traded within the Fairtrade (one word) system are sold at (or above) a guaranteed minimum price, which is supplemented by a Fairtrade Premium, used to fund infrastructure or welfare projects within the producer community. Other standards governing working conditions and environmental issues are also applied. The international Fairtrade system - made up of Fairtrade International and its member organizations - represents the world's largest and most recognized fair trade system.
wfto logo The World Fairtrade Organization (WFTO) - previously known as IFAT - is a global network of organizations representing all levels in the Fair Trade supply chain. One of the leading global Fair Trade organizations, it established - along with FLO - the 10 principles by which Fair Trade is widely defined. Whereas FLO certifies products, WFTO certifies organizations, namely those which demonstrate a 100% commitment to the principles of Fair Trade. Consequently, whilst FLO's Fairtrade Mark is most commonly associated with crops and commodities, WFTO certification tends to be associated with producers of small-volume crafts, where the product certification approach would be difficult to apply.
bafts logo BAFTS is the British Association of Fair Trade Shops & Suppliers (itself a member of the WFTO). Its members may be retailers or importers and wholesalers, committed to the values and practices of Fair Trade. As well as providing marketing support and other networking benefits to its members, BAFTS membership (which is subject to scrutiny) also communicates to the consumer a good deal about the values of the organization. Not all Fair Trade products bear the Fairtrade Mark or the WFTO logo - there are many Fair Trade organizations around the world - and BAFTS-accredited importers will have demonstrated the commitment and knowledge necessary to vouch for the supply chain credentials of the products they are selling.
Vegan Trademark This symbol, introduced in 1990, is the registered trademark of the Vegan Society, and by far the most widely applied and recognized vegan certification. There are currently some 16,000 registered Vegan products (as of 2014). Vegan products must be completely free from animal products, including honey, lanolin, beeswax, eggs, dairy products, and so on, as well as any ingredient derived from such products.
vegetarian society logo Established in 1847, the Vegetarian Society claims to be the oldest vegetarian organization in the world. The 'Vegetarian Society Approved' trademark is displayed on more than 5,000 products and attests that a product contains no animal flesh, stock, gelatine or any other ingredients resulting from animal slaughter. Eggs must be free range and genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) are prohibited. Furthermore, there must be no cross contamination with non-vegetarian products during the production process, and no animal testing is permitted.
leaping bunny The Leaping Bunny was originally a mark of the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV). Leaping Bunny certification is applicable both to cosmetics and household products. It certifies that a product was not tested on animals (nor any of its ingredients after a fixed cut-off point). The claims made for the product are verificable and regularly audited. In 2012 the BUAV co-founded Cruelty Free International to campaign globally against animal testing. In 2015 the BUAV merged with the new organization and now operates solely under the new identity.
soil association logo The Soil Association was formed in 1946 by a group of farmers, scientists and nutritionists to campaign for healthy and sustainable food, farming and land use. Alongside its campaigning, educational and technical consultancy activities, the Soil Association is now the UK's leading organic certification body, and its familiar logo (also represented by the certification code 'UK5') appears on more than 70% of organic products sold in the UK. The Soil Association's organic standards exceed the EU minimum requirements in many areas, but particularly in relation to animal welfare, GM and the use of pesticides. In addition to food, they have standards for restaurants, health and beauty products, clothing and textiles, and gardening products.
Organic UK2 Logo Organic Farmers & Growers is the UK's second largest organic certification body, with its own product label and the certification code 'UK2'. Alongside organic product and producer certification, OF&G is involved in the inspection and certification of biofertiliser produced from anaerobic digestion.
German Organic symbol The German Organic Seal was introducd in 2001 as a common label for any certified product which met EU minimum standards. As such it can be seen as something of a 'lowest commion denominator' standard, as various individual certification bodies - notably Bioland and Demeter - generally uphold stricter requirements. Many products therefore bear two labels - the state logo as well as that of the particular certifying body. Moreover, the German seal is now being widely replaced by the new EU organic logo.
EU Organic Logo The new EU Organic logo was introduced in 2010 and since 2012 it has been compulsory to include it on the packaging of food produced and sold within the EU, provided that it meets EU organic standards and is described and certified as such. For processed products, it means that at least 95% of the agricultural ingredients are organic. Next to the new EU organic logo, the code number of the control body is displayed (for example, GB-ORG-05 for the Soil Association) as well as the place where the agricultural raw materials were farmed. National and institutional logos can still be displayed as well, and often are, both because people recognise them and because, in may cases, they may relate to a higher standard than the EU legislation requires.
GOTS label The Global Organic Textiles Standard (GOTS) is recognised as the world's leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibres. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Only textile products that contain a minimum of 70% organic fibres can become GOTS certified. The UK's Soil Association is one of the lead organizations in the GOTS Consortium. Currently (2015) there are 16 bodies licenced to certify to the GOTS standard worldwide. Display of the GOTS logo is not compulsory, but it may only be used when the labelled product has been certified along its entire value chain.
Natrue Logo Created in 2008, the NaTrue label serves to distinguish higher quality natural products from those which are merely called 'Natural Cosmetics' (a term for which no internationally binding legal definition exists). The main criteria for certification are: No synthetic fragrances and colours; no petroleum derived products (parafines, peg, -propyl-, -alkyl-, etc.); no silicone oils and derivatives; no genetically modified ingredients (complying with EU Organic regulations); no irradiation of end product and botanical ingredients; products must not be tested on animals.
BDIH logo The BDIH is the German Association of manufacturers and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, health care products, food supplements and personal hygiene products (www.bdih.de). Through a specialist working group it established in 2001 one of the first significant frameworks for defining and certifying Natural Cosmetics, with an influence far beyond Germany itself. However, a number of companies with significant international markets are now opting to certify their products through Natrue instead.
ecocert logo EcoCert is an organic certification organization, founded in France in 1991, but with subsidiaries in many other, mainly European, countries, making it one of the largest organic certification organizations in the world. Ecocert primarily certifies food and food products, but also certifies cosmetics, detergents, perfumes, and textiles. The company inspects about 70% of the organic food industry in France and about 30% worldwide. Ecocert is also a leading certifier of fair trade food, cosmetics and textiles according to Ecocert Fair Trade standards.
EU-Ecolabel The EU Ecolabel (or EU Flower) is a labelling scheme managed by the European Commission through national competent bodies. Its criteria were first established in 1992 and revised as recently as 2015. In March 2015 more than 44,000 products had been awarded the label, which must always displayed together with a license number. Standards have been drawen up for more than 30 non-food product groups, and take account of factors such as raw materials, manufacturing processes, packaging, distribution and disposal. Qualifying products must of course demonstrate a relatively benign environmental impact.
nordic-eco-label The Nordic EcoLabel is the official eco-label of the Nordic countries, established in 1989 by the Nordic Council of Ministers with the purpose of providing an environmental labelling scheme that would contribute to sustainable consumption. It is a voluntary, positive Ecolabelling of products and services, conceived as a practical tool to help consumers choose environmentally-sound products. Detailed criteria exist for some 63 product groups. With very high recognition (around 95%) within the Nordic countries, the label also commands respect in other countries.
blue-angel-logo The Blue Angel (Der Blaue Engel) is a German certification for products and services that have notable environmentally friendly characteristics, particularly in relation to other products serving the same purpose. It has been awarded since 1978 by the 'Jury Umweltzeichen', representing environmental and consumer protection groups, industry, unions, trade, media and churches. Blue Angel is the oldest ecolabel in the world, and covers some 10,000 products in around 80 product categories.
ethical consumer best buy The Ethical Consumer magazine was launched in 1989 and its Best Buy Label is designed to help shoppers choose what it regards as genuinely ethical products and services. The Ethical Consumer attaches great importance to the ethical record of the company behind the product. For example, a jar of coffee could be certified as both Organic and Fairtrade, but be made by a controversial multi-national corporation with poor ethical credentials overall. Such a product would never receive the Ethical Consumer Best Buy logo.
öko-test very good Öko-Test is an environmentally oriented German consumer magazine. It is better known (in its home market) and more widely available than its nearest UK counterpart, Ethical Consumer. Its highest accolade is the 'Sehr Gut' (Very Good) label. However it differs in significant ways from the Ethical Consumer 'Best Buy' label. Although Öko-Test regularly features issues related to company ethics and global trade, a product's composition and environmental impact are the pre-eminent bench-marks when it comes to testing and evaluation. Also, Öko-Test is much more concerned with a product's merits in terms of consumer satisfaction than Ethical Consumer, so that a product with 'Sehr Gut' label, can be assumed to be of good quality as well as environmentally sound. It is perfectly possible for large mainstream companies to have their products given the top award.
fsc logo The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an international, non-governmental organisation dedicated to promoting responsible management of the world’s forests. There are three versions of its 'tick tree' logo: '100%', 'Recycled' and 'Mix' (previously 'Mixed Sources'). The last of these is the most common and also the most complex. It allows for products to contain wood that is not recycled or from FSC-certified forests, though controls are in place to reduce the chances of illegally forested wood or wood which contributes to deforestation being included. We encourage the use of products labelled 'FSC 100%' or 'FSC Recycled' wherever possible.
allergy uk Allergy UK (also known as the British Allergy Foundation) is the leading national charity dedicated to supporting the estimated 21 million allergy sufferers in the UK. Their Seal of Approval indicates that a product has significantly reduced allergen/chemical content, or that it has been shown to reduce or remove allergens from the environment of the user.

Non-proprietary Symbols

recycling symbol Recycled product. Visit the Recycling Now Website.
made in UK Made in the UK
vegan sticker Vegan product
vegetarian sticker Vegetarian product
GF sticker Gluten-free product
organic sticker Organic product
refill sticker Refillable product (local customers). Read about our local product refill service here.